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August 10, 2009

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qudseya Naim

Dear Laura, you inspire me so much with your words of wisdom . I learn so much from you. I have been teaching for about 4yrs. I still have not be able to have a quiet classroom. I have a very strong voice also that I am not able to speak softly like I should any advice will be greatly appreciated . Thank you again and God bless you

Laura


Typically a child who is so reserved that they are not engaging in any work is not disruptive. However, occasionally they "get into" someone else's work at which point I would intervene and explain that it's so and so's turn now and they may do it when that child is finished.
Very rarely, but it does happen, a child may just watch for several days before attempting to try anything, even when the adults in the environment are inviting them to try different things. I only have 3-5 year olds in my class. They do have pretty much complete freedom in what they would like to do. However, when they are with me for the second year, I do encourage them to try more lessons in the math and language areas.

Hope that helps!

Laura


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Subject: [My Montessori Journey] SurvivingByGrace submitted a comment to 'Some more things to know'.
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These blog posts on first days of class are so essential to learning how to implement Montessori. I could ask a zillion questions. I'd love to know your comment to handling the 3yo. And when you say you don't make a child choose something to do (even if it takes 6 weeks), what do you do if they're disruptive? Do they generally just watch for the whole work period? When you describe the children choosing their own work - does this apply only to the younger children? Do the 6-9s have more of a "list" to complete for the week/day, and only have the freedom to choose the order? Thanks again for these posts!

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SurvivingByGrace

These blog posts on first days of class are so essential to learning how to implement Montessori. I could ask a zillion questions. I'd love to know your comment to handling the 3yo. And when you say you don't make a child choose something to do (even if it takes 6 weeks), what do you do if they're disruptive? Do they generally just watch for the whole work period? When you describe the children choosing their own work - does this apply only to the younger children? Do the 6-9s have more of a "list" to complete for the week/day, and only have the freedom to choose the order? Thanks again for these posts!

MWT

Just stumbled across this and wanted to comment that, as a parent of a child in a Montessori school (and a former Montessori student myself), this is an excellent post to help explain in everyday terms what a Montessori classroom is like and how the philosophy is brought to life. I am bookmarking it to share with other interested parents and those who ask what Montessori is.

Lei

Thank you so much for such a wonderful and inspiring post. I have started a school this year and your day-to-day account inspire me in so many ways. THe way you arranged your classroom and organized your materials. Thank you...

We just opened the school this June and all of my 14 students are new and never been in a Montessori. The challenge is when you have old (meaning 4 weeks old) and new students is it possible to have an undisturbed work period of at least 2.5 hours? What is the trick? I also find repeating my self all the time of the ground rules (walking feet and soft voice etc.) that i sometimes wonder if they really are getting it. Circle time is a challenge due to some 3yo who wont stay on the line and/or keeping themselves busy with friend beside them... I would be so much interested as well to hear your experience (if there's any) in handling such a class. Again, God bless you in what you do.

Teresa Clark

Thank you so much for sharing all of this. You have given me some great ideas to use in my own classroom.

Sarah

Wow! These last 2 posts have been really great. And I would have never guessed that you were in a small school with a less than "ideal" work period for the children. I would have said that you were in a fancy and demanding private school - the kind that just wore the love of Montessori out of an acquaintance of mine. But no, you are the one creating the love for Montessori in so many others. And with all the work that you do for your classroom (and all the work it takes to share with us) I wouldn't have guessed that you are the director as well. I really don't know how you have time to do it, but I am thankful as I've learned a lot from you.
I've done a decent amount of reading on the subject, but Maria Montessori is a little hard to read as an author (or maybe it is the translations that are so dry). You've put it into lay terms very well. I've heard it put simply before but not like this. Thank you!

Gypsy

Hi Laure
This is such a great blog, I have only just discovered it but there is such an amazing amount of info! If you ever get a minute, I have just written a blog post on the differences between Waldorf, Montesori and Playcentre (which is New Zealand Parent-run thing we have here) and I would love your comment on whether I have done Montessori justice in my summary. I totally understand if you don't get a chance though - you have such a lot of projects on the go!!! Gypsy http://domesticallyblissed.blogspot.com/2009/08/children-at-play-steiner-playcentre-and.html

Sandra Candel

Dear Laura,
I can relate soooo much to your situation. I set up a little home-based Montessori school, for my three kids, and eventually for my nieces, nephews, friend's kids, etc. Kids did not attend daily, and although I loved the flexibility and free time I got, I must confess it was less than ideal. My mentor, (Montessori AMS teacher for 25 yrs. with one of the most amazing schools I know) always encouraged me to teach 5 days with 3-hr work periods. I closed my school last June to get a Masters and better prepare myself.
I think I'm finally ready to begin my own blog. Would you mind sharing with me what type of Typepad account you have? I want to get the very basic for about $5/mo., but I'd like to have one in Spanish as well.
Thank goodness for wonderful women like you who enrich other mom's knowledge.

m@w

Dear Laura,
I've been a silent reader until now. I'm a working mother of two and I live in Italy.
My older attends a public non-montessori pre-school I'm quite satisfied with, the younger is beginning the kindergarden this year.
Up to this, seems a very common Italian situation indeed, but it's not so simple to explain the challenges we experience daily in a few words and in a foreign language.
As an example, did you know that the Montessori method is less known here than abroad? Nevertheless I become completely fascinated with it and I found it the natural complement of our lives. Without being homeschoolers, we tried to create a Montessori inspired setting at home; you can have a glimpse in one of the recent posts of muy blog, where I often try to discuss educational tips (in Italian).
Well, all this is just to ask you if I can translate your last post in Italian and host them in my blog (with credits, of course) one day or the other. I've often been asked about the Montessori method, but, since I'm not, until now I've directed them to professionals or books, usually in English; more and more often I've been asked for something in Italian. So if you can trust in my unprofessional yet better than unsupervised translation, I believe your posts are well worth to be spread in Maria Montessori's native Country.
Thanks.

Heather

These posts have been really interesting to me...I've had the Montessori method "explained" to me before but never on a day-to-day basis or how it is taught. This has been very enlightening to read!

I enjoy your ideas and posts very much! Thanks for inspiring me with ideas for my little ones!

Jamie

Well, it's official. We're packing our bags and moving so our kids can attend your school. (Okay, not really. But I wish!) Where are you again Laura? I remember the general area, but not your city. I *think* we might have friends that moved up that way, also Montessori students, but I'm thinking they're in a larger town.

I agree with a previous commenter, I love reading your posts because you explain things so well but also because you can 'hear' the passion you have. It's inspiring.

And oh my! I didn't realize you were responsible for the school and so many students. I have so much respect for you and what you do, we're blessed that you share with us.

Thank you! I'm thinking of you as you begin your new school year.

Catherine

I am so glad I found this blog and it has been so inspiring for me. I really appreciate everything you share. I have been interested in Montessori ever since I heard of it but have never been near a school unfortunately. With the lack of alternative schooling where I am currently living I have decided to homeschool my preschool age son instead and your blog provides me with most of the activities he now enjoys. Do you know, is there any way to do some training via the internet?? I realise that would kind of miss the point for full on teacher training but at least some sort of basic training? I would love to learn more for my own children's benefit.

Sandra Candel

I have been using the Montessori method for about 5 years. Other moms have told me they can feel my passion for Montessori, and I can absolutely say the same about you.
Your blog is so inspirational, it gave me lots of ideas, and my little home school blossomed when I found your blog last year.
Thank you!

Jodi

I just wanted to thank you so much for everything you share! Your thoughts and ideas are so inspiring to me!

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